Menopause in Midlife—Strange Symptoms, Amazing Facts, What’s Really Happening in The Female Body?

Posted by Medical Board on January 4, 2019 in Uncategorized
Menopause in Midlife—Strange Symptoms, Amazing Facts, What’s Really Happening in The Female Body?

Every day, millions of women around the world experience significant physical, mental, and emotional changes attributed to midlife and the menopause transition.  Some cultures readily accept this time in a woman’s life, encouraging positive associations with the change, and its many effects.  Others treat menopause as a disease or condition requiring medical intervention.  By far, one of the most difficult challenges surrounding menopause is the reluctance of many women to talk about specific symptoms and to share their very personal experiences with their physicians.

Women tend to look to other women including mothers, grandmothers, sisters or friends for answers in midlife.  Checking with each other to determine what’s “normal” and what to expect in the upcoming years is common in nearly every society. 

Weird Symptoms in Menopause

Most women know about the common vasomotor (relating to blood vessel constriction) symptoms of menopause such as hot flashes and night sweats and these are thoroughly understood by the medical community.  Some women report a few very unusual symptoms however. 

Burning Tongue—Women may experience a burning sensation on either the tip of their tongue, or at the back of the tongue.  Burning inside the mouth, in general is associated with a hormone imbalance in this case.  This can last several years throughout the menopause transition.

Electric Shocks—Some women feel strange sensations like tiny electric shocks, in the head, or deep within the layers of skin.  These are sometimes followed by hot flashes.  While no one knows for sure why shocks occur, theories implicate vitamin B deficiencies and fluctuating hormone levels.

Itchy Skin—Some women report the feeling of ‘ants crawling on their skin’.  This can happen while lying down at night, or can come on for no apparent reason in the middle of the day.  Thankfully, this sensation is rare, but is definitely linked to hormonal changes in the body around the time of menopause.

Balance Disturbances—Some women experience difficulty with balance during menopause.  Missteps and falls become more common, as normal neurotransmitter activity may be interrupted. 

Menopause—Interesting Facts 

Menopause occurs in the United States between the ages of 45 and 55.  It may start earlier however in women who:

  • Smoke
  • Live at higher elevations
  • Are malnourished

Some cultures view menopause as a positive time in a woman’s life, filled with great freedom and release from fears of pregnancy.  Older women in general are seen as assets in society, having gained wisdom and experience to be passed on to a younger generation.

An entire industry has been created for menopausal women, making way for a number of inventions designed to keep women comfortable in the middle years.  Innovations include cooling fan neck pillows, jewelry filled with non-toxic cooling gel, sheets and pajamas that wick away sweat, and temperature controlled cooling pads for the bed.

In the late 1800’s and early 1900’s, treatment for “the menopause” included among other things, electric therapy, opium dosing, and arsenic consumption to cure the disturbing malady.  

Hormonal Balance—The Key to Understanding Menopause

Many women needlessly suffer with uncomfortable symptoms associated with hormonal balance, or a hormone-related medical condition.  Throughout a woman’s life, hormone levels of estrogen, progesterone, and testosterone fluctuate in response to the body’s needs and natural aging process.  During the reproductive years hormones are released in cycles to support fertility and the monthly menstrual process.  Cortisol, DHEA, Thyroid (T3, T4), and FSH (follicle stimulating hormone) also play a role in overall female health or reproduction. When hormonal balance is affected, either by natural developmental processes and aging, or certain medical conditions, a female hormone imbalance test can yield important medical information.

Menopause and its Effects

When menopause occurs, the natural cycle of menstruation ends altogether. This is due to changing hormone levels of estrogen, progesterone, and testosterone.  These changes, while generally natural can cause significant emotional and physical changes. Many women experience a sense of relief and freedom in menopause while others feel a sense of loss at the inability to bear children any longer.  The period leading up to menopause, referred to, as “perimenopause” can be fraught with depression, mood swings, anxiety and sleeplessness for some women.  Physical symptoms may also include fatigue, weight gain, irritability, hot flashes, and vaginal dryness.

Perimenopause—Navigating The Many Symptoms of Premenopause

Premenopause, or perimenopause, as it is technically known signifies an important time in a woman’s life.  As she naturally transitions to the non- childbearing years, many physical and emotional changes occur.  

What is Perimenopause?

Menopause is defined as the time when a woman has naturally ceased menstruation for 12 consecutive months.  This usually occurs in middle age between the late 40’s and early 50’s.  The period leading up to the actual event of menopause where menstrual periods become irregular, and symptoms of pre menopause occur, is known as perimenopause.

Signs and Symptoms of Perimenopause

Perimenopause is a time of great change, where many women report uncomfortable or distressing symptoms that seem to “sneak up” on them.  Adding to the confusion about what’s happening within their bodies are changes in mood and memory that further complicate this period.  

While symptoms of perimenopause vary widely among women, there are several common changes that may occur including:

Irregular Menstrual Periods—One of the first signs of perimenopause, that most women notice is a change in their regular menstrual cycle.  Where once periods were predictable and on- schedule, the length of time between periods begins to vary.  

Menstrual flow may become lighter at times, with heavy flow occasionally, as well.  

Depending on the length of time between periods, women can also determine whether they are in the early, or later stages of perimenopause.  The longer the interval between menstrual cycles, (60 days or more) the greater the likelihood they are in the late stages of perimenopause.

Hot Flashes and Night Sweats—Hot flashes can occur any time throughout the day or night and include a sudden hot flush in the body, which may travel up the torso, head and face. This may also be accompanied by a rapid heartbeat and reddening of the skin, and last up to five minutes.  Night sweats often occur while sleeping and include profuse sweating and chills after hot flashes.  

Sleep Disturbance—Perimenopausal women may have difficulty falling asleep at night, or staying asleep.  This may be the result of uncomfortable night sweats, but not always.  Some women suffer insomnia-like symptoms associated with perimenopause due to hormonal changes. 

Changes in Mood—Some women experience increased irritability and depression in perimenopause.  Lack of sleep may contribute to these symptoms, as well as changes in biochemical activity in the brain.

Memory Loss and Brain Fog—Because of the effect low estrogen may have on certain neurotransmitters within the brain, women in perimenopause may experience short-term memory loss, difficulty concentrating, and foggy thinking.

Loss of Vaginal Lubrication—Throughout the various stages of menopause as estrogen levels diminish, vaginal tissue may become dry and lose some of its elasticity.  

Urinary Conditions—Loss of tissue tone within the vagina may contribute to urinary incontinence.  Lower estrogen levels can put women at risk for urinary tract infections as well. 

Decreased Fertility—The chances of becoming pregnant during perimenopause are reduced since ovulation is irregular, however it is still possible.  A woman can still conceive if she has a menstrual period, though less likely. 

Change in Libido—Sexual arousal and drive may decrease during perimenopause, though not always.  Lower levels of estrogen, fatigue, and vaginal discomfort during intercourse may contribute to these changes. 

Bone Loss—During the period of perimenopause women become at-risk for bone loss, due to the lack of estrogen.  This can lead to osteoporosis, causing porous bones that break easily. 

Changing Cholesterol Levels—An increase in low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, or “bad” cholesterol may occur as a result of low estrogen.  High-density lipoprotein (HDL), or “good” cholesterol declines during perimenopause as well.  These changes may contribute to heart disease in some women.   

Treatment for Perimenopause

The period of perimenopause leading up to actual menopause and the cessation of menstruation is a natural life event for most women.  With the exception of medical problems or conditions that interfere with the natural course of menopause, every woman will experience the slow down and eventual end of ovulation and menstruation.  

While many women will go through the many physical and emotional changes associated with perimenopause with only minimal discomfort, others will require natural or medical intervention.

A gynecologist, or other healthcare practitioner may advise a combination of lifestyle changes, natural dietary supplements and/or prescription medications for the treatment of symptoms.

These may include:

  • Modified Diet
  • Cardio-vascular exercise
  • Yoga/meditation
  • Altered sleeping environment
  • Vitamin/Mineral/Herbal Supplements
  • Anti-anxiety medication
  • Anti-depressant medication
  • Sleep Aids
  • Cholesterol medication
  • Topical Lubricants
  • Hormone Replacement Therapy

With increased awareness and attention to the many changes experienced in perimenopause, women can experience the natural process of female aging with lower levels of discomfort and fewer concerns.

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